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Cognitive and human factors in expert decision making: six fallacies and the eight sources of bias

  • Public lecture
  • Learning human
Event date:
Time:
14:00–15:30
Event location:
Online
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Lecturer Itiel Dror, PhD Harvard, Senior Cognitive Neuroscience Researcher, University College London 

Itiel Dror is a cognitive neuroscientist who is interested in the cognitive architecture that underpins expert decision making. Dror's research, published in over 130 research articles (including in Science and Nature), demonstrates how contextual information can influence judgments and decision making of experts. He has worked in a variety of domains, from policing and aviation, to medical experts and bankers, showing that even hard working and competent experts can make unintentional errors in evaluating data. Dr. Dror has worked with many agencies in various countries to minimize error and enhance decision making.  More information available in the address www.cci-hq.com.

The lecture will be held in English. 

Suggested background reading on the fallacies and sources of bias available in the address  https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.analchem.0c00704

Registration open until 18.3.2021.

After Itiel Dror’s lecture and a short break, at 15.45–16.45 researcher Moa Lidén from Uppsala University and University College London will give a lecture titled Human vs. Biological Witnesses: How Useful is Forensic DNA Phenotyping as an Investigative Tool? Data from an Ongoing Research Project. There will be a mutual participation link and registration form to both lectures.

You will receive the Zoom link for this webinar a week before the lecture. 
Maximum capacity in this meeting is 300 participants.

The lectures are open for everyone interested in the topic. Welcome!

However, the recording of the lecture will be available only for the forensic psychology students at the University of Eastern Finland as part of their studies.